02 Jul Relieving Toothache Pain, Part 1

One of the most common tooth issues out there for both children and adults is a toothache, which can include symptoms ranging from throbbing pain to inflammation around the tooth and gums. There are several reasons why a toothache might begin, but they all have a common theme: They hurt a lot, and you’ll be looking for ways to dull the pain while you wait to get into our dental offices. At Three Rivers Dental, we can help you prepare for these kinds of situations. In part one of this two-part blog, we’ll go over some of the simple home remedies we typically offer to help soothe toothache pain until our dentist is able to help. Salt and Hot Water This is the single most common method for removing pain in the teeth, and requires no special ingredients or processes. Simply mix one tablespoon of salt in a glass with hot or warm water, whichever you prefer. Then rinse, swish and gargle this water in the area of your toothache pain. If needed, repeat this process several times. Salt and hot water are a known combination that helps with irritation. The combination helps remove fluids from the gums that are leading to the issue, helping relieve the pain. Ice or Cold Compress Another very common method of pain reduction is using ice or cold compression, and the teeth are no exception. These can be used either on the inside or outside of the tooth that’s aching. Apple Cider Vinegar Apple cider vinegar is a natural antiseptic, meaning it helps disinfect areas of the mouth. Perhaps more importantly, though, it’s also acidic, meaning it kills bacteria that lead to toothaches. Simply soak a cotton ball in apple cider vinegar and press it gently onto your tooth. Alcohol While this is obviously only acceptable for adults, alcohol can help kill germs plus numb your painful area. Like with apple cider vinegar, simply soak a cotton ball in a bit of whiskey, scotch, vodka or...

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03 Jun Common Causes of Teeth Grinding

At the dental offices of Three Rivers Dental, we regularly see patients for bruxism, or teeth grinding. This condition, which most commonly occurs during sleep, involves a clenching of the jaw muscles and, sometimes, the movement of teeth back and forth against each other. Bruxism affects around eight percent of adults, and it can cause a few complications if left unaddressed, including worn down teeth. Let’s look at some of the most common causes of bruxism, which can help you identify the source and address the issue. Stress or Anxiety Stress and anxiety are by far the largest single factor in bruxism. According to the Bruxism Association, nearly 70 percent of all cases are due to this cause. Many of us think we can put our stress aside when we go to sleep, but this often isn’t the case – often, it shows up subconsciously through things like teeth grinding. The most significant single stressor here is work-related stress, which can interfere with sleep in multiple ways and can create a negative sleep cycle. If possible, look for ways to relieve work-related stress. Sleep Disorders Several sleep disorders are linked with bruxism, and may make you more likely to suffer from it. These include sleep apnea, snoring, acid reflux, breathing issues, and various parasomnia types including sleep paralysis, sleep talking and others. Medical Side Effects In some cases, certain medications will cause teeth grinding. Some drugs for sleep, anxiety or depression even cause this, which obviously makes things a bit complicated here. Malocclusion or Other Tooth Issues Malocclusion, or misaligned teeth, can also cause bruxism. Teeth that don’t line up will not meet properly when you close your mouth, which lessens the stability of the jaw. This can lead to stress on the muscles and joints in the jaw, which can then lead to bruxism. Lifestyle Considerations These may not be direct causes of bruxism, but certain lifestyle choices can put you at a higher risk for developing it. These include smoking, using tobacco,...

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03 May How to Respond to a Lost Crown or Filling

For those who need them, dental crowns or fillings are important replacements in the mouth that fill in for bad teeth. It’s not common, but crowns or fillings can come out for a number of reasons, even if they’ve been installed perfectly. At Three Rivers Dental, we’re here to help if this happens to you. Here are the steps you should take, including what to do while you wait to see our dentist. Keep If Possible First of all, if it’s at all possible for you to keep the crown or filling that came out of your mouth, do so. Remove it from your mouth immediately so you don’t accidentally swallow it – though if this happens, you’ll pass it naturally and there’s no need to worry. After you remove it, keep it if possible and bring it to our dental offices so our dentist can assess it. Call Us Immediately From here, call our offices immediately and set an appointment with our dentist. Temporary Filling Material While you’re waiting to see a dentist, the primary concern is protecting the tooth and the root. If the lost crown is intact, you can sometimes slip it back over the tooth temporarily, using dental cement purchased from a drug store to hold it in place. If this won’t work, try using dental wax over the tooth for a temporary barrier – this can also usually be found at drug stores. Stay Clean Take extra oral caution if you have an exposed interior. Gently brush the area to remove food debris, and rinse the mouth with warm salt water after eating. Pain Relief A crown or filling falling out can expose nerves, which can cause pain during eating or drinking. If this is serious, consider applying clove oil to the tooth – it helps alleviate pain. Over-the-counter pain medication can also be used. Food Avoidance Try to chew food on the other side of your mouth while you wait for the crown or filling to be replaced. In...

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03 Apr Learning Basic Tiers of Sedation Dentistry

For those who are in need of certain dental services that may cause pain or discomfort, a service called sedation dentistry is used. Also called relaxation dentistry, this is a way for your dentist to decrease pain and any discomfort or anxiety you might have. At Three Rivers Dental, we offer a couple different types of sedation dentistry. Let’s look at the full range of tiers generally included in the field of sedation dentistry. Laughing Gas Coming in the form of nitrous oxide and also referred to as anxiolysis, this is the mildest form of sedation dentistry. “Laughing gas” can help your anxiety decrease – it can also be administered in pill form for people who prefer this. If you’re taking any medications or have any significant medical conditions, tell your dentist about these before receiving anxiolysis. Moderate Sedation Also called conscious sedation, this is a level where you maintain normal breathing and can respond to verbal and physical cues. You are not fully unconscious at any point. Most IV sedation dentistry falls under this category, which can also be done using oral methods. Deep Sedation While this isn’t technically part of the standard sedation dentistry package, deep sedation may be used in special cases that range between moderate sedation and general anesthesia. Patients under deep sedation may not breathe independently, and may or may not lose reflexes or be unable to respond to various stimulations. General Anesthesia General anesthesia is also technically not part of sedation dentistry, However, it can be used in very rare cases where people might not be right for other areas of sedation dentistry. General anesthesia involves full loss of consciousness during a procedure. For more on the varying tiers of sedation dentistry, or to learn about any of our other dental services, speak to the staff at Three Rivers Dental today....

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03 Mar Clarifying Common Root Canal Myths

When it comes to possible dental procedures, root canals have built up a bit of a negative reputation over the years – and unfortunately, this reputation isn’t really founded. You’ve probably heard several details that might make you hesitant to get a root canal procedure done, but are you sure what you’ve heard is true? At Three Rivers Dental, we’re here to help set the record straight. Here are a few common areas where we commonly see root canals mislabeled, plus the true facts to know moving forward. Pain Levels For starters, there’s a widespread belief that root canal treatment is extremely painful and will cause major discomfort. This is simple a myth, brought on by a number of potential causes – expectations of pain, actual pain that’s due to the dead or decaying tooth (not the root canal), or associations with earlier treatment methods that did have pain associated with them. With today’s technology, though, root canals are not painful. Basic anesthetics and sedation dentistry practices allow for you to be fully numb during the procedure – root canals today have a similar pain level as receiving a common filling, with virtually no pain whatsoever. Don’t Just Pull the Tooth Another common misconception is that instead of a root canal, it’s always better to simply pull the tooth. The opposite is actually the reality here – it’s best to keep your natural tooth for as long as possible, with removal viewed as a last resort of sorts that can lead to other dental issues. Root Canals Don’t Cause Illness Another big myth surrounding root canals is that they lead to various illnesses or diseases, including arthritis, kidney disease, or heart disease. But this myth comes from a study that was done almost 100 years ago, well before modern medical understanding had come along. Root canals are completely safe, and actually help eliminate bacteria that come from infected roots of the teeth – this improves oral and overall health. For more...

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05 Dec Herald: Kennewick dentist leads team to El Paredon, Guatemala

Thanks to Sara Schilling for documenting the work that our Dentist, Bart Roach, has been doing in Guatemala. THE TEAM Dr. Bart Roach of Three Rivers Dental in Kennewick brought along several other dental professionals and volunteers on his Thanksgiving trip to El Paredon, Guatemala. The team included dentists Floris Hartman of Amsterdam, Nate Green of Denver, Ted Graham of Federal Way and Revenda Bebawi, an Army dentist serving in Germany. She participated on her own time, taking leave. Dental hygienists Katie Rodgers and Kirsten Perry of Arizona also took part, along with non-dental volunteers Leslie Green, Joelle Hartke, Yesenia Lopez, Rosario Vargas, Tanguy Conq and Delphine Pédron. Staff of The Driftwood Surfer also pitched in. Read more here: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/local/article118772063.html#storylink=cpy   EL PAREDON, GUATEMALA It was toward the end of the week — Thanksgiving morning, maybe — when the little girl sat down in the plastic chair. She was wearing jeans and a red-and-white shirt, her hair pulled into a ponytail. She wasn’t crying, like some of the other kids who’d occupied the same spot in the hours and days before. But she was scared. Read more here: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/local/article118772063.html#storylink=cpy ...

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05 Dec Herald: For Kennewick dentist, Guatemala mission is a promise kept

On November 19th the Herald ran a story about our Dentist, Bart Roach, and his commitment to helping the people of Guatemala through dentistry. It's a good read with more to follow. See the full story here. http://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/local/article115997978.html   Bart Roach first visited Guatemala a decade ago, when he was fresh out of college. He’d gone to the Central American country to volunteer, but didn’t last long at it. After three weeks, he had an epiphany: he wasn’t doing much good. So the Pasco native — part of the sprawling Roach family, which has deep roots in the Tri-Cities — quit and helped run a hostel in Guatemala instead, staying four months. And he made a promise: He’d come back when he had some real skills. Roach is a man of his word. Now 32 and a dentist, he’s back in Guatemala this week — leading a team of dentists and dental hygienists from around the world. Read more here: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/local/article115997978.html#storylink=cpy...

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05 Jul On Human Connection…

(The following is a Tri-City Herald article from 7/3/16. It can be found here: http://www.tri-cityherald.com/news/local/article87498592.html) Editor’s note: Bart Roach, owner of Three Rivers Dental in Kennewick and co-founder of the nonprofit Sonrisa Immaculata, returned to the Guatemalan coast in April to bring dental care to the people of El Paredon. It was his fifth trip to the Central American country. He led a team that included five dentists and 10 volunteers from Washington, Arizona,Denver, Canada, Amsterdam, England, Australia and Guatemala. The team treated more than 400 people, restoring about 800 teeth and extracting more than 250 teeth in 4 1/2days. Roach also has traveled to Cambodia and Tibet, treating people with little or no access to dental care. Here, he shares some thoughts about his overseas work. For some time I have reflected, as I am sure many of you have, on happiness and satisfaction with how we spend our short time on this earth. In this context, I have grappled with the paradox that we are one of the most medicated societies in the world, despite the creature comforts we enjoy — and so often take for granted — as citizens of the United States. Three trips ago to the Guatemalan highlands, I sat in conversation with Dr. Jose Miguel as we made our way along the Pan-American highway toward the town of Nahualá. I had seen, many times over, that — despite the poverty, lack of opportunity, fatality and ostensible justification for sadness — the people of Guatemala were not sad. They are quick to smile, through a toothache; quick to share, despite their poverty; quick to engage one another, despite being “strangers.” Reflecting on this difference in cultural dispositions, I asked the good doctor, “How often do you give pills to people for depression?” At first, he did not even understand the question. After explaining the context in my second language, Dr. Jose eventually said, “Oh no, Bartolome, never. Sometimes you are happy, sometimes sad — that...

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children in guatemala

12 Apr Tri-City dentist finds adventure, connection in India

LEH, INDIA Editor’s note: Tri-City dentist Bart Roach travels the world using his skills to help people with little to no access to dental care. The owner of Three Rivers Dental in Kennewick recently spent 2 1/2 weeks in the Ladakh region of India with the nonprofit Global Dental Relief. In between helping treat 550 children, he spent time exploring and making new friends. Here is the story of how one of those friendships blossomed: I descend from Snow View Homestay toward the tourist center of Leh as the retreating sun descends behind the Karakoram front range, illuminating the Ladakh Valley in purple light. Skipping from cobblestone to cobblestone between Tibetan architecture, roofs neatly piled high with silage for the impending winter, I emerge from the footpath to Upper Changspa Road. The last light of day brings life to the community hockey pond, filled with scarlet millet, ripe for threshing. Itinerant construction workers building the grandstand light kerosene stoves to cook dal, squatting in front of lantern-lit pyramidal tents from another century. Soon, the pond will be flooded, and Ladakh will host the annual hockey match with the Canadian Embassy team from Delhi. I look right, where the traffic comes from, and check my gait as a Royal Enfield motorcycle zooms past my shoulder carrying two Desi-looking youth, hair slicked, on their way to a good time. I switch on the flashlight on my iPhone and continue my journey west, evading potholes, until I get back to the arterial footpath wending between the three strata of Leh. I emerge onto Fort Street and into the chaos of an Indian evening. The best commercial hours are in the evening as trekkers and dharma seekers return from the mountains. Moseying toward their repast, they window-shop for pashminas, carpets and tin trinketry. Old men pass with heaps of cardboard on their heads. Motorcycles, tuk-tuks, tourism vans and lorry trucks evade sacred cows and tourists as they vie for space on a paved road one-third the...

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